SCIENCE: Labeling the Parts of a Flower

Objective: Students will learn the anatomy of a flower by creating their own 3D flower.

Vocabulary: Petal, Sepal, Stem, Stamen, Pistil, Stigma, Style, Ovary, Anther and Filament

Time: A 2 Day project, approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Difficulty Level: *****

What You Will Need: Wire (14 gauge armature wire works best), Popsicle sticks, straws,  Acrylic Gloss Medium or Mod Podge, Acrylic Paints, Aluminum foil, Green electrical tape or Duct tape, Model Magic and small cups or containers.

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Preparing for Project:

1. You will need to cut wire to approximately 9 inches.  You will need 6 of these wires for each student. You will also need to cut wire to 3 inches.  You will need 6 of these wires for each student also.DSCN0512

2. Tear a 6 inch strip of Aluminum foil for each student.

3. Pour approximately 3-4 tablespoons of Gloss Medium or Mod Podge into the cups or containers (this can be done up to an hour before students begin the activity). You will need 1 cup for each student.

Project Time:

DAY 1:

DSCN05131. Pass out the 6 long wires to each student.  Have the students bend their wires in half.  Using their hands, have the students turn their wires into the shape of a football, leaving the bottom inch pinched together (see picture below).  This will soon become their petals.

DSCN05142. Have the students lay their 6 wire petals down on the aluminum foil and flatten the wires as best as they can.

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3.  Pass out the Acrylic Gloss Medium to the students.  After students have arranged their petals on the foil, they may add 3-4 drops of acrylic paint into their medium.  Do not use tempera paint.  This will make the petals crack.  Mix the medium and paint together.

4. When students have combined their mixture, they can then pour their mixture into the center of the petals. Use Popsicle sticks to spread the mixture even.  Students will want to make sure that the mixture is touching, even slightly overlapping their wires on all sides.

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5.  Set the petals aside to dry overnight. Sometimes moving the petals can be tricky. If you can place trays, place mats, or even tag board, under the foil before you start, I’ve found that it is much easier to move the wet artwork.

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6.  Pass out the 3 inch wires and a quarter sized piece of model magic to each student.

DSCN0520DSCN05197.  Have students tear a tiny piece of model magic and roll it into a Tic-Tac shape.  Students can add the piece of clay to the end of a 3 inch wire. Repeat this step until all 6 wires have the Tic-Tac shaped Anther.

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8. Take the remaining clay and mold a Pistil.  Place the stamen and pistils next to their petals to dry.

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DAY 2:

1.  Have students peel their petals off of the aluminum foil (kids LOVE this part). If any of the mixture seeped out  past the wire, students can use scissors to trim the excess.

2. Pass out a straw to each student.  Push each stamen inside of the end of the straw and wrap with tape.IMG_2128

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IMG_21293. Take three of your petals and arrange them around the top edge of the straw. Secure the petals with tape. Then take the remaining petals and arrange them between each of the first three petals.  Secure with tape.

4. You can make Sepal by cutting a few rectangle pieces of tape. Fold the edge of the tape diagonally.  The exposed tapeIMG_2130 at the bottom can be used to adhere the sepal to the straw.  With green tape, wrap the end of the wires, all the way down to the bottom of the straw.

5.  Gently have the students bend the wires of the petals outward.

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IMG_2131IMG_21326. place a generous amount of glue at the center of the flower and place your pistil at the center.  It is important that the flower is standing to dry.

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Assessment: When the flowers are dry, students can use pins to label the parts of the flower.  If your students have iPads, they can take a photograph of their flower and label the photograph. Frappuccino bottles, or other glass bottles are a great way to display their amazing work!

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