How-To-Draw a Unicorn

Objective: Students will learn how to draw a unicorn using simple shapes. Students will also learn how to add shadows using a variety of colors.

Difficulty: *****

Time: 45 minutes

What You Will Need: Paper, Pencil, Eraser, Permanent Marker, and Coloring Supplies.

Printable How-To-Draw Version:

Reading: After The Fall

Objective: Students will discuss and identify dynamic and static characters in stories. Students will discuss and determine whether Humpty Dumpty is a dynamic or static character using text evidence. Students will create a work of art to represent his transformation.

Difficulty: *****

What You Will Need: “After The Fall” by Dan Santat, This Printable Art Page below, scissors, glue, and paint, crayons, glitter, or other art supplies.

Before You Get Started: Print out template for each student participating. Use cardstock for the template if possible. 

Define dynamic and static characters in texts. Provide a few examples of dynamic and static characters and why an author intentionally creates dynamic and static characters in books.

In table groups, ask the students to discuss dynamic and static characters from books, tv shows and movies. Come back together and discuss your findings.

Looking at the cover, have students make a prediction about whether Humpty Dumpty will be a static or a dynamic character.

Read the book: Read the story and ask the students to determine if their predictions were correct. Ask students to use text evidence to support their answers!

Project:

1. Pass out a printed template and cut out the pieces.

2. Draw a face and clothes on the egg. Trace and color.

3.  Cut out the long strips from the template. These will be used for arms and legs. Before gluing them to the egg, crinkle them by folding them back and forth as shown in the picture below.

4. Glue the hands and feet to the crinkled strips. Glue them to the egg.  

5. draw your bird on your cut paper. Make sure you draw on the side without dashed lines. You will use the dashed lines to fold your wings in. Trace and color your bird.

6. Fold the wings on each of the dotted lines separately. Lay the bird open again.

7. To fold up the bird, hold each wing, pressing inward on the horizontal fold. The wings should close in and collapse the wings.

8. Fold down on the final dotted line.  

9. Glue the top of the egg to the top back tab of the folded bird paper.

10. Glue the bottom of the egg to the bottom front tab of the folded bird paper.

11. On the sign, write a fear you have overcome or wish to overcome. Glue the sign to your egg’s hands.

12. Inside your birds body, write how you have or how you would like to overcome the fear you identified on your sign.

12. Fold the bird back up so that the egg looks whole again. When you pull on the top of the head, it opens the bird and represents the transformation of overcoming your fears.

Extension Activity: Have your students write a story about the fear they have or want to overcome. How will they change once they’ve overcome their fears? Display the writing and art together.

How-To-Draw Summer Break Cows

IMG_6745Objective: Students will ramp up for summer break by learning how to draw a fun cartoon cow in this drawing tutorial!

Time: 45 minutes

Difficulty: *****

Materials: paper, pencil, permanent markers, coloring supplies (I used colored pencils and watercolors). 

Use This link: https://youtu.be/0imcraKCWSE

READ ALOUD: The Very Impatient Caterpillar

Untitled-1Objective: Students will use a K-W-L chart to discuss or review the metamorphosis of a caterpillar to butterfly. Students will apply their knowledge to the book, “The Very Impatient Caterpillar.” Students will create a work of art that reviews the metamorphosis of a caterpillar and the sequence of events in the book. Time: 1 hour

Difficulty: *****

 

What You Will Need: “The Very Impatient Caterpillar,” by Ross Burach, This K-W-L chart and Printable Art Page:MetamorphosisKWL, scissors, paint, crayons, glitter, or other art 914dPcxmtpLsupplies and a nonfiction book on butterflies.

Before You Get Started: Print out a chart and a cacoon template for each student participating. Use cardstock for the template if possible. 

In small groups, discuss the process a caterpillar takes to become a butterfly. Fill out the first two sections of the K-W-L Chart. Come together as a whole group and discuss what facts the class came up with. Also, discuss what students may want to learn about metamorphosis. 

Read Aloud: Read the book. Have students summarize the series of events and compare it to what they already knew about a caterpillar’s metamorphosis. Then look to see if any of the things they wanted to learn were covered in the book.  Then take a look at the final section of the K-W-L chart. Was there anything that the students learned from the book?

Project:

1. Pass out a printed template and cut out the pieces, including the two curved tabs.

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2. Fold the sides on the dotted line, and then open it back up. 

IMG_66203.  We are going to use the dip-and-flip method to paint the cacoon. Set out a palette full of greens blues and yellows. Using a flat brush, dip one side of the brush in one color paint and then flip it over and dip the other side in another color. Do not mix the colors together. As you brush the paint onto the cacoon, it will naturally create streaks of blended color on your cacoon. Paint the whole back-side of the cacoon. 

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IMG_66224. While the outside of your cacoon dries, cut out your caterpillar and paint it using the remaining green paint. 

 

 

IMG_66265. Once the cacoon is dry, flip your paper over. Students will then design their wings on the inside of the cacoon. Students may paint or color them however they like. 

 

 

 

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6. Fill in the leftover space with leftover green paint by dipping and flipping.

7. If you have glitter, you can add glitter to your cacoon. 

 

 

8. Fold the cacoon up. Slip the caterpillar into the tabs. Open the cacoon and see the metamorphosis!

Extension Activity: In the book, “The Very Impatient Caterpillar,” the Caterpillar learns (or maybe not!) an important lesson about being patient. Have the students reflect, in a journal entry, about a time when they just couldn’t be patient. Ask them to relate it back to the story using text evidence.

You can display the student work on a 12X18 piece of paper. Invite the students to include their journal entry OR facts they learned about the metamorphosis of a butterfly! 

How-To-Draw Cupcakes

IMG-6596Objective: Students will learn how to draw cupcakes. Students will also learn how to burnish with a white colored pencil to shade the frosting!

Time: 1 hour

Difficulty: *****

Materials: paper, pencil, permanent markers, coloring supplies (I used permanent markers). Optional: shaving cream, craft paint, paintbrush, and cardboard scraps.

Use This Link: https://youtu.be/lsONBa5hxuo

Printable How-To-Draw Version:Untitled-Artwork (11)

How-To-Draw A Shark!

SharkObjective: Students will learn how to draw a shark. Students will also learn a simple printmaking technique using shaving cream and craft paint. 

Time: 45 minutes

Difficulty: *****

Materials: paper, pencil, permanent markers, coloring supplies (I used permanent markers). Optional: shaving cream, craft paint, paintbrush, and cardboard scraps.

Use This Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FFM5yblpgU

Printable How-To-Draw Version:

Untitled-Artwork (10)

READ ALOUD: Just Like I Wanted

IMG_6502Objective: Students will participate in a drawing activity that will require them to be flexible and creative. Students will also engage in a Text-to-Self comprehension activity. 

Time: 45 Minutes – 1 hour

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Difficulty: *****

What You Will Need: “Just Like I Wanted,” by Elinoar Keller and Naama Peleg Segal, Paper, pencils, permanent markers and coloring supplies (I used BIC permanent markers). 

Just Like I Wanted Drawing Challenge:

1. We are going to begin with the project today. This will help students make connections with the main character of the book. This drawing challenge requires 2 or more people to participate and only takes about 5 minutes to complete.

IMG_6504IMG_65052. Fold your paper in half as shown. Then fold it in half again. Make sure there is a folded paper for each person in the activity. 

3.  Open up the paper. The folds create four distinct quadrants on your paper.  In your head think of something you would like to draw. Do not share this with anyone at the table.

IMG_65064. In the first quadrant, draw the top of the item you planned on drawing. Do not draw your entire object, but rather just 1/4 of your object. Extend the lines of your drawing just past the fold.  Draw for 1 minute then put your pencil down (My son started drawing a lighthouse on the shore). When you’re done, fold the first quadrant back so that it’s not visible to the next player. 

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5. Pass the paper to the person to your right. Continue drawing your object in the second quadrant of your new paper. Try to use the visible lines at the top of the quadrant to start your next drawing. Don’t forget to extend your lines just past the fold. Draw for 1 minute then stop (my wife was drawing a clock). Fold the second quadrant back.

IMG_65096. Pass the paper to the person to your right. Continue drawing your object in the third quadrant, extending your lines just past the fold. Draw for 1 minute then stop (my daughter was drawing a field full of flowers). Fold the third quadrant back. 

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7. Pass the paper to the person to your right. Finish your drawing on the final quadrant using the visible lines to guide your drawing (I had been drawing a unicorn).

 

 

8. Now pass the paper back to the original drawer (depending on how many people you have drawing, this could be you). Unfold the paper and look at what you have. It is now the original drawer’s job to turn the jumbled mess into “just what they wanted.”  The only catch is that they cannot erase any of the lines that had been added during the exercise! Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t make sense! It’s your job to make sense of the chaos on your page! 

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Read Aloud: Now read, “Just Like I Wanted,” by Elinoar Keller and Naama Peleg Segal. As you read, invite your child or student to make connections between the experiences the main character had in creating art and their own experiences with the exercise they just completed. Did they share the same feelings? Did they solve their problems in similar or different ways? Ask your students to use text evidence to explain their answers. 

Use a graphic organizer or a Vinn Diagram to organize your thoughts. 

Extension Activity: Use your completed drawing as a writing prompt. Create a story or fairy tale based on what is happening in the picture. Display the drawing and the writing together!